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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
between religion and politics. james taylor and his recent appearance at the national press club. later, michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was h
of muslim women are defying their religion by mailing out of their faith. the women are often ostracized from the families and communities. some experience violence. now in a ground-breaking move, muslim and christian groups are calling for interfaith marriages to be accepted. a report from london. >> when she told a deeply religious parents she intended to marry non-muslim, they were devastated. feared us because it would not be islamic league valid she would be committing a grave sin. >> a mother was very hostile because she said you cannot marry outside of your religion because it would cause massive issues in the future. fundamentally the biga problem thelly, i cannot marry outside of my faith and what does it mean as a muslim and for the community and how they perceive me. >> her husband, a christian, did not convert. >> we believe in one god. we have a similar book. in the form of the
this. i never heard a word spoken against his religion. and i would have been ausoffend by that. it never came up as a negative. i never saw it anywhere. >> i agree with that. you give credit to where credit's due. they didn't take a shot on him in religion. that wouldn't have worked in this country anyway. and this is better than an inside baseball story. this is inside the dugout story. i'm not getting paid and i love talking about it. >> me too. what did you find as a journalist, what did you find? because you've been watching romney since he was a moderate republican not that long ago. m. >> 2002. of course he called himself moderate and progressive and so forth. the romney in 2012, he was talked into iz by his son tagg and wife ann. once he decided to run, he was all in. but there was this question how do you run? the signal was let's focus on president obama's handling of the economy and lesser emphasis on biography. >> that worked well in that first debate. i was dying in that first debate he was so good. it was arrogant but it worked. why didn't he stay on that line he w
there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to sleep during the coldest and rainiest nights of the year. it's been this mayor and his predecessors who look to what happened at hurricane katrina, saw the key role that congregation leaders, facilities and congre gants can play at the time of a diseafert disaster and called us to stakeholders and mayor lee invi
of religion in a second republic, in a postrevolutionary egyptian state. and there were some new elements introduced that hadn't existed in previous constitutions. there was a larger role carved out for religion with a number of articles in the constitution. that had been controversial, not so much for what they did but insomuch as i think more than as much as they were in what they allowed for. so you had, for example, article 2 is the standard iteration of the role of sharia -- the principles of sharia in defining legislation, but you also had article 4, which allowed for a role of the al-azhar university for the first time, which is an unelected body, a religious body that issues religions opinions. and so this role was very vague, but it was enshrined in the constitution. you also had probably the most controversial is article 219, which attempted to define what principles of sharia actually meant, and in doing so i think the wording, of course, is very vague and i would say it doesn't open -- it doesn't create a religious state, but it opens the door to a religious state that could b
. they should be able to train without having religion forced on them. joining me with reaction is executive director for the dr. ron cruise who is a retired army chaplain. good morning to you, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we see a situation in west point. one cadet who was an athiest felt uncomfortable with taking part in involuntary prayer, your reaction. >> it is a shame we don't respect the pluralism. can prayer in west point went back from the founding of our country and we need to respect the religious beliefs of all. those who believe and those who don'tment those who believe have every right to prayer and those who don't believe opt out of the prayer. we need to remember that our founding fathers, george washington upon his appointment as commander-in-chief in the army. one of his first acts was to ask congress to authorize chaplains in every brigade so that religious services could be held. prayer is fundament will in the lives of our soldiers from the beginning of our country and west point would do well to resist efforts by athleast advocates. >> i read a portion
free speech rights in the first amendment. why wouldn't they have the free exercise of religion rights that are also in fact, they start the first amendment as the religious -- i think it's a very important point to make that though hobby lobby has had a tough time taking this to get the preliminary injunction, nothing has been decided on the merits. we actually just won yesterday in 7th court of appeals. our client. corporation. not a religious organization. a regular company. they got the injunction, we have done that for two other of our clients we're 3 for 3. the judges matter in this situation who you get before you this is important precedent. how many companies might have an objection to providing the morning after pill. what justice society to my your said they are not religious organizations. how do you get around that burden? >> i think you get around the burden by saying forever legal purposes this is not a fun term for people and it's true. this is how the law works. when you look at the law really holding here it's the first amendment. really the religious freedom restorat
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is th
of religion. they are inalienable and it is unfathomable to us that there are parts of the world where they don't believe that. it's amazing, but true. how far do we go in pushing what we believe to be universal rights when we know we're going to get some kind of negative reaction? i mean, can we be tough or russia because they're less important to us than say, china or saudi arabia? >> i think the russians would like us to be tougher. what is quite interesting is that vladimir putin might have stepped out too far on this issue. there are 600,000 orphans in russia right now which is more than they had during the time of world war ii. now, oftentimes the russians and russian public opinion can be quite anti-american except in this case almost 40% of russians actually support the act which when you consider it it's not a majority, but coming from a country that's often anti-american and public opinion that's really significant. >> when putin was signing the thing he said, so what if the living standards in other countries are better than ours? so what? i don't care. should we all move th
michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations, then george will talks about religion and politics. later, james taylor from a recent appearance at the national press club. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i'm a big decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay. i went
should extend discrimination law, or you should protect the free exercise of religion to the greatest extent possible? we would get these cases and resolve them in terms of a particular liberal or conservative political agenda. there are ways of characterizing us that make more sense in terms of what we do. some of my colleagues prefer to adhere strictly to that text of the statute. others of my colleagues look more expensively to what we call the legislative history of the background of the statute, or a purpose, and it makes sense to refer to them in those terms. some of those think it is important what the framers of the constitution were thinking about at the founding when they drafted it. others on the court take a more flexible view and think that the interpretation of the constitution should be informed by evolutionary developments. those sorts of things make sense. it is easier, i think, for court reporters to say that justice is liberal and that justice is conservative, and i do not think it is helpful in looking at what we do. >> let me switch to a question about -- more int
politics and religion. >> both the house and the senate will return tomorrow. the senate is in a 10:00 a.m. eastern to work on two bills, one to extend provisions of the foreign intelligence service act and another is a relief package for areas affected by hurricanes can be. a vote is planned for 5:30 p.m. eastern on a least one of those measures. and the house returns at 2:00 p.m. eastern. their agenda depends on the status of the fiscal cliff negotiations. debate is possible in both chambers on any possible deal. live coverage at the house here on c-span and the senate on c- span 2. >> now a look at the war in syria and the potential for ssad regime.the a joined by former state department analyst, this is just over an hour. >> thank you, everybody, for coming this afternoon for a very timely discussion. on behalf of our chairman of the board, i want to welcome everybody to the center for national policy. i am the senior fellow for the middle list -- for the middle east here at cnp. we will discuss what is in store for the post-assad syria. mark twain once said that news of my death has
this is a cradle of islam and christianity and judiascan m. all religions were born in the middle east and how unfortunate on christmas day he and his family have to go through this all over again. >> there is sayed. >> fox news broke that case and i followed the case since the night he was arrested and we went to the media in order to not make the case worse. if you go to the media your case gets worse. >> what is your advice to americans and western christians that are watching this unfold and persecution that takes place. >> you want to be very careful when traveling to different parts of the world when you are from the west first of all and when you are openly christian and thirdly trying to convert others. both pastors were spreading the gospel and that is obvious low something they look at as spreading war. >> christianity even offers home in iran. thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> we have i newspaper printing the name and addresses of every gun owner. someone turned the tables on the paper. but plus, tax incentives for electric cars and taxing owners for having electric cars. we'll
and various cities, there's no room for kids and not even a thought process. let's face it, religion is on the slide in terms of the major politics are in the newspaper. let's talk about those. >> i'm not a regulation man but we are fooling with the cycle of life. the cycle of life means you replace yourself for the next generation. western economies rely on growth. you stop growing, you're like a sha shark, you die, we need to do that for the debts we're piling up. what fuels growth is the next generation of young workerings. young workers are not coming into the workforce. look at southern europe with youth unemployment. take 15% youth unemployment in spain and compound that with the fact they stop having babies. what happens in a generation or two. >> i tell you, bill, you got me thinking, i encourage readers to read this. in some of the biggest developed economies pushed the most growth are below a 2% utility rate. this has to be dealt with at some point. back to you. >> thanks, rick. >>> road trip and big bank is in highways an byways in the road for yield. we'll explain how. an
thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. i think all the people at this table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door-to- door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come too. i think that is really importa
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)